1. When I was in VIII standard, which feels like yesterday but is actually a little more than a decade ago, the only options for entertainment on television were Cartoon Network and Splash Channel. While I can recall the shows on Cartoon Network (which could be because I still watch it occasionally), I cannot recall any of the shows on Splash, other than two of their home productions, The Pandavas and Sinbad. Both Pandavas and Sinbad were 3D cartoons, which were novel at that time, yes, but also terrible. The movements were jerky, almost epileptic, and the emotions on their faces were binary – they either looked like  needed to take a dump but couldn’t find a toilet or they looked stoned. This, though, was in 2003. Animation was still new to “Our Industry” (Somewhat related factoid – Finding Nemo released in 2003). When I complained about the sub-par animation of Kochadaiyaan on Twitter, I received a couple of replies to the tune of “Tamil Cinema-kku idhu nannave irundhudhu“. Why do we say that? It is not like the creators didn’t have a budget (it was close to Endhiran’s I think). It is not like the creators have never been exposed to quality animation. Why is it that they can take advantage of the fact that it is Tamil Cinema? And why do we let them? Why can’t Tamil Cinema, and more importantly, Tamil audience, have “Hollywood Quality” movies?

2. I’m going to rant about the animation again – The rendering is so focused on Rajnikanth that it seemed to ignore the other characters completely – Deepika Padukone looked less like Deepika and more like Gareth Bale, and her choreography seemed like it was borrowed from The Sims.

3. The story, and screenwriting though, are very good. It’s gripping, it’s interesting, the dialogue is snappy. The reincarnation of actor Nagesh was slighta too much for me, but it worked in it’s own way I suppose. 
4. That you had to have a Rajnikanth – 3 just to help the audience come to the conclusion that Rajnikanth-2 had avenged Rajnikanth -1, I just couldn’t able to. 
5. What really bums me out is that, if only this film had been taken realistically, with a good visual effects team, that would’ve been something new, something bold and a step like none other. Surya’s landmark flop, 7 Am Arivu is probably best proof of this – everyone loved the first fifteen minutes and wanted to leave the theatre for what followed. Historical fantasy/mythology (whether or not it involved any relatives of NT Rama Rao) has had a history of doing well in the past, is always going to sell, and to think of Thalaivar in a Game of Thrones style film – goosebumps.